Tuesday, March 31, 2020
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ARGENTINA | 22-08-2018 10:09

Momentum builds to remove Kirchner monuments

As Argentina's Congress considers a bill, some local government authorities seeking to rid themselves of references to Kirchner are taking things into their own hands.

In Argentina and abroad, momentum is building to bring down a number of monuments honouring former president Néstor Kirchner.

Kirchner, who died in 2010, is tied to a number of scandalous corruption cases including the recent "notebook" case in which the former president allegedly headed a kickback scheme with construction sector bosses using funds for public works projects.

The most recent move against the Kirchner legacy comes from a ruling Cambiemos (Let's Change) lawmaker, Josefina Mendoza, who is pushing in Argentina's Congress for a law to heighten restrictions on public monuments.

"It seemed important to me that we establish a standard by which people who are prohibited from taking public office [due to their criminal record] should not be represented in public spaces, streets or monuments", Mendoza told Perfil.

LOCAL INITIATIVES

In the meantimes, some local government authorities seeking to rid themselves of references to Kirchner are taking things into their own hands.

The City Council of San Rafael in Mendoza resolved last Wednesday to remove the name of “Néstor Carlos Kirchner” from the local bus terminal, in place since the ex-president’s death. Kirchnerite Mayor Emir Félix might yet veto the initiative.

Rosario will also be removing Kirchner’s name from a monument, with authorities there describing him as “a prime figure in the most corrupt government in Argentine history.”

For its part, the Greater Buenos Aires district of Morón has withdrawn a bust of Kirchner in recent days.

As far away as Ecuador, the National Assembly voted 72-30 to remove the huge statue in front of Unasur headquarters.

And a petition with 8,000 signatures is seeking to restore the original name of the Centro Cultural Kirchner to “Bicentennial”.

-TIMES

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