Buenos Aires Times

world IWF MEETING IN BRAZIL

Proposal to create whale sanctuary in South Atlantic voted down

Brazilian-led bid, co-sponsored by Argentina, is shot down by abstentions and lobbying from pro-whaling nations.

Today 02:13 PM
A Southern right whale glides in the waters off Playa El Doradillo in Puerto Madryn, Patagonia, Argentina, during the annual whale migration from Antarctica to Patagonia to give birth and feed their offspring.
A Southern right whale glides in the waters off Playa El Doradillo in Puerto Madryn, Patagonia, Argentina, during the annual whale migration from Antarctica to Patagonia to give birth and feed their offspring. Foto:AP-Maxi Jonas

A proposal to create a whale sanctuary in the South Atlantic has been defeated at a crunch meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC).

Pro-whaling nations on Tuesday blocked the near two-decade effort to create a haven for the endangered marine mammals, deepening divisions at an already fractious IWC meeting in Brazil.

The South Atlantic Whale Sanctuary was backed by 39 countries with 25 voting against and several countries not casting a vote, and so failed to get the required two-thirds majority from the 89-member body.

Opponents of the plan argue the science doesn't support the case for a sanctuary. And they say it's not necessary because there isn't any commercial whaling occurring in the South Atlantic.

Brazil's Environment Minister Edson Duarte, whose country has proposed the creation of the sanctuary since a 2001 IWC meeting, said he was disappointed but would continue to call for worldwide support in the future.

"As minister for the environment in a country with 20 percent of the world's biodiversity in its forests, we feel highly responsible for the stewardship of our wealth, for the whole world, and this goes for cetaceans as well," Duarte said to applause from delegates.

Co-sponsored by Argentina, Gabon, South Africa and Uruguay, it was first discussed in 1998 and voted on since the 2001 meeting of the IWC.

Pro-whaling nation Japan voted against the project. The Japanese delegation has pushed for a rule change at the biennial meetings that would allow decisions to be made by simple majority instead of the current three-quarters majority.

This would make it easier for Japan to push through its proposal to end a 32-year moratorium on commercial whaling and re-introduce "sustainable whaling," much to the ire of those nations that are against the practice. 

It would also, as Japanese Foreign Ministry officials pointed out at the Brazil meet, have enabled the creation of the long-envisioned South Atlantic Whale Sanctuary.

New Zealand's Commissioner Amy Laurenson, speaking in favour of the sanctuary, told the meeting it was about protecting whales, "not about determining the outcome for other areas of the world."

The deadlock illustrates the divide in the commission, where some countries think whales can be hunted sustainably and others want more conservation measures. The commission banned commercial whaling in the 1980s, but Japan is proposing to reinstitute it with catch limits.

- TIMES/AFP/AP

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