Buenos Aires Times

argentina HUMAN RIGHTS

Number 127: Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo find another grandchild

The Abuelas, formed in October 1977, have now identified 127 children who were snatched away from their families, given new identities and handed to families acceptable to the military junta.

Wednesday 27 December, 2017
President of the Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo, Estela Barnes de Carlotto.
President of the Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo, Estela Barnes de Carlotto. Foto:CEDOC

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The Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo have announced that a new missing grandchild has been recovered, the 127th of the organisation’s four-decade search for justice.

The human rights organisation said they would hold a press conference to “announce the happy news of the meeting of a new grandchild, number 127.”

The event would take place “tomorrow, at 1pm, at our headquarters at Viceroy Cevallos 592,” read a press release.

“The aunts of the granddaughter, who have waiting 40 years for this reunion, will be present at the press conference,” the statement said.

The Abuelas, formed in October 1977, have now identified 127 children who were snatched away from their parents, given new identities and handed to new families after their parents were killed by the 1976-1983 military junta.

The news comes just less than a month after the identification of the 126th grandchild. Six, including the latest, have been found this year.

The grandmothers, now aged in their 80s and over, lost either a son or a daughter to forced disappearances for opposing the military regime, and in many cases, their babies that were born in captivity. They believe as many as 500 children were given up for adoption to relatives or associates of the regime. Their parents were among the 30,000 murdered by the junta.

The news came just hours after it was revealed that convicted human rights repressor, Miguel Etchecolatz – a former deputy Buenos Aires provincial police chief during the 1976-83 military dictatorship, who has been found guilty of crimes against humanity and is serving six life terms – had been granted leave to serve out the rest of his sentence under house arrest in Mar del Plata.

The news sparked an angry response from human rights organisations and victims.

- TIMES


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